Clinical Studies and Case Reports

On this site you will find clinical studies with cannabis or single cannabinoids in different diseases and case reports on the use of cannabis by patients.
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TitleMarijuana smoking does not accelerate progression of liver disease in HIV-hepatitis C coinfection: a longitudinal cohort analysis.
Author(s)Brunet L, Moodie EE, Rollet K, Cooper C, Walmsley S, Potter M, Klein MB; Canadian Co-infection Cohort Investigators.
Journal, Volume, IssueClin Infect Dis 2013;57(5):663-70.
Major outcome(s)The use of cannabis did not accelerate progression to significant liver fibrosis.
IndicationHIV/AIDSAbstract
MedicationCannabis

BACKGROUND: Marijuana smoking is common and believed to relieve many symptoms, but daily use has been associated with liver fibrosis in cross-sectional studies. We aimed to estimate the effect of marijuana smoking on liver disease progression in a Canadian prospective multicenter cohort of human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus (HIV/HCV) coinfected persons.
METHODS: Data were analyzed for 690 HCV polymerase chain reaction positive (PCR-positive) individuals without significant fibrosis or end-stage liver disease (ESLD) at baseline. Time-updated Cox Proportional Hazards models were used to assess the association between the average number of joints smoked/week and progression to significant liver fibrosis (APRI ≥ 1.5), cirrhosis (APRI ≥ 2) or ESLD.
RESULTS: At baseline, 53% had smoked marijuana in the past 6 months, consuming a median of 7 joints/week (IQR, 1-21); 40% smoked daily. There was no evidence that marijuana smoking accelerates progression to significant liver fibrosis (APRI ≥ 1.5) or cirrhosis (APRI ≥ 2; hazard ratio [HR]: 1.02 [0.93-1.12] and 0.99 [0.88-1.12], respectively). Each 10 additional joints/week smoked slightly increased the risk of progression to a clinical diagnosis of cirrhosis and ESLD combined (HR, 1.13 [1.01-1.28]). However, when exposure was lagged to 6-12 months before the diagnosis, marijuana was no longer associated with clinical disease progression (HR, 1.10 [0.95-1.26]).
CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective analysis we found no evidence for an association between marijuana smoking and significant liver fibrosis progression in HIV/HCV coinfection. A slight increase in the hazard of cirrhosis and ESLD with higher intensity of marijuana smoking was attenuated after lagging marijuana exposure, suggesting that reverse causation due to self-medication could explain previous results.

Route(s)Inhalation
Dose(s)
Duration (days)
Participants690 people positive for HIV and hepatitis C virus
DesignOpen study
Type of publicationMedical journal
Address of author(s)Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Full textwww.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23811492

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