Clinical Studies and Case Reports

On this site you will find clinical studies with cannabis or single cannabinoids in different diseases and case reports on the use of cannabis by patients.
You may search for diseases (indications), authors, medication, study design (controlled study, open trial, case report etc.) and other criteria.




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TitleLow-dose vaporized cannabis significantly improves neuropathic pain
Author(s)Wilsey B, Marcotte T, Deutsch R, Gouaux B, Sakai S, Donaghe H
Journal, Volume, IssueJ Pain. 2013 Feb;14(2):136-48
Major outcome(s)Cannabis reduced pain. No difference in efficacy between the two doses.
IndicationPainAbstract
MedicationCannabis

We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling medium-dose (3.53%), low-dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being visual analog scale pain intensity. Psychoactive side effects and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed-effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the 2 active dose groups' results (P > .7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo versus low-dose, 2.9 for placebo versus medium-dose, and 25 for medium- versus low-dose. As these NNTs are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1 to 2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain.PERSPECTIVE: The analgesia obtained from a low dose of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (1.29%) in patients, most of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite conventional treatments, is a clinically significant outcome. In general, the effect sizes on cognitive testing were consistent with this minimal dose. As a result, one might not anticipate a significant impact on daily functioning.

Route(s)Inhalation
Dose(s)
Duration (days)
Participants39 patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain
DesignControlled study
Type of publicationMedical journal
Address of author(s)Northern California Health Care System, and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California 95817, USA
Full texthttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23237736

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