Clinical Studies and Case Reports

On this site you will find clinical studies with cannabis or single cannabinoids in different diseases and case reports on the use of cannabis by patients.
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TitleCharacteristics of patients with chronic pain accessing treatment with medical cannabis in Washington State.
Author(s)Aggarwal SK, Carter GT, Sullivan MD, ZumBrunnen C, Morrill R, Mayer JD.
Journal, Volume, IssueJ Opioid Manag. 2009 Sep-Oct;5(5):257-86.
Major outcome(s)88 % suffer from more than one pain syndrome
IndicationPainAbstract
MedicationCannabis

OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to better understand the characteristics of chronic pain patients seeking treatment with medicinal cannabis (MC). DESIGN: Retrospective chart reviews of 139 patients (87 males, median age 47 years; 52 females, median age 48 years); all were legally qualified for MC use in Washington State. SETTING: Regional pain clinic staffed by university faculty. PARTICIPANTS: Inclusion criteria: age 18 years and older; having legally accessed MC treatment, with valid documentation in their medical records. All data were de-identified. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Records were scored for multiple indicators, including time since initial MC authorization, qualifying condition(s), McGill Pain score, functional status, use of other analgesic modalities, including opioids, and patterns of use over time. RESULTS: Of 139 patients, 15 (11 percent) had prior authorizations for MC before seeking care in this clinic. The sample contained 236.4 patient-years of authorized MC use. Time of authorized use ranged from 11 days to 8.31 years (median of 1.12 years). Most patients were male (63 percent) yet female patients averaged 0.18 years longer authorized use. There were no other gender-specific trends or factors. Most patients (n = 123, 88 percent) had more than one pain syndrome present. Myofascial pain syndrome was the most common diagnosis (n = 114, 82 percent), followed by neuropathic pain (n = 89, 64 percent), discogenic back pain (n = 72, 51.7 percent), and osteoarthritis (n = 37, 26.6 percent). Other diagnoses included diabetic neuropathy, central pain syndrome, phantom pain, spinal cord injury, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, HIV neuropathy, visceral pain, and malignant pain. In 51 (37 percent) patients, there were documented instances of major hurdles related to accessing MC, including prior physicians unwilling to authorize use, legal problems related to MC use, and difficulties in finding an affordable and consistent supply of MC. CONCLUSIONS: Data indicate that males and females access MC at approximately the same rate, with similar median authorization times. Although the majority of patient records documented significant symptom alleviation with MC, major treatment access and delivery barriers remain.

Route(s)Inhalation;Oral
Dose(s)
Duration (days)
Participants139 patients with chronic pain
DesignOpen study
Type of publicationMedical journal
Address of author(s)University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
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