Clinical Studies and Case Reports

On this site you will find clinical studies with cannabis or single cannabinoids in different diseases and case reports on the use of cannabis by patients.
You may search for diseases (indications), authors, medication, study design (controlled study, open trial, case report etc.) and other criteria.




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TitleA preliminary controlled study to determine whether whole-plant cannabis extracts can improve intractable neurogenic symptoms.
Author(s)Wade DT, Robson P, House H, Makela P, Aram J.
Journal, Volume, IssueClinical Rehabilition 2003;17:18-26
Major outcome(s)Pain relief associated with both THC and CBD was significantly superior to placebo. Impaired bladder control, muscle spasms and spasticity were improved by cannabis in some patients
IndicationSpasticity;Spinal cord injury;Multiple sclerosis;PainAbstract
MedicationCannabis;Delta-9-THC;Cannabidiol

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether plant-derived cannabis medicinal extracts (CME) can alleviate neurogenic symptoms unresponsive to standard treatment, and to quantify adverse effects. DESIGN: A consecutive series of double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled single-patient cross-over trials with two-week treatment periods. SETTING: Patients attended as outpatients, but took the CME at home. SUBJECTS: Twenty-four patients with multiple sclerosis (18), spinal cord injury (4), brachial plexus damage (1), and limb amputation due to neurofibromatosis (1). INTERVENTION: Whole-plant extracts of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), 1:1 CBD:THC, or matched placebo were self-administered by sublingual spray at doses determined by titration against symptom relief or unwanted effects within the range of 2.5-120 mg/24 hours. Measures used: Patients recorded symptom, well-being and intoxication scores on a daily basis using visual analogue scales. At the end of each two-week period an observer rated severity and frequency of symptoms on numerical rating scales, administered standard measures of disability (Barthel Index), mood and cognition, and recorded adverse events. RESULTS: Pain relief associated with both THC and CBD was significantly superior to placebo. Impaired bladder control, muscle spasms and spasticity were improved by CME in some patients with these symptoms. Three patients had transient hypotension and intoxication with rapid initial dosing of THC-containing CME. CONCLUSIONS: Cannabis medicinal extracts can improve neurogenic symptoms unresponsive to standard treatments. Unwanted effects are predictable and generally well tolerated. Larger scale studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

Route(s)Sublingual
Dose(s)
Duration (days)
Participants24 patients with multiple sclerosis (18) or spinal cord inju
DesignControlled study
Type of publicationOther
Address of author(s)Oxford Centre for Enablement, Windmill Road, Oxford, UK. derick.wade@dial.pipex.com
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