Clinical Studies and Case Reports

On this site you will find clinical studies with cannabis or single cannabinoids in different diseases and case reports on the use of cannabis by patients.
You may search for diseases (indications), authors, medication, study design (controlled study, open trial, case report etc.) and other criteria.




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TitleMarijuana use is not associated with cervical human papillomavirus natural history or cervical neoplasia in HIV-seropositive or HIV-seronegative women.
Author(s)D'Souza G, Palefsky JM, Zhong Y, Minkoff H, Massad LS, Anastos K, Levine AM, Moxley M, Xue XN, Burk RD, Strickler HD.
Journal, Volume, IssueCancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Mar;19(3):869-72.
Major outcome(s)Cannabis use is not associated with cervical human papillomavirus natural history or cervical neoplasia in HIV-seropositive or HIV-seronegative women.
IndicationCancerAbstract
MedicationCannabis

Marijuana use was recently reported to have a positive cross-sectional association with human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer. Laboratory data suggest that marijuana could have an immunomodulatory effect. Little is known, however, regarding the effects of marijuana use on cervical HPV or neoplasia. Therefore, we studied the natural history (i.e., prevalence, incident detection, clearance/persistence) of cervical HPV and cervical neoplasia
(i.e., squamous intraepithelial lesions; SIL) in a large prospective cohort of 2,584 HIV-seropositive and 915 HIV-seronegative women. Marijuana use was classified as ever/never, current/not current, and by frequency and duration of use. No positive associations were observed between use of marijuana, and either cervical HPV infection or SIL. The findings were similar among HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women, and in tobacco smokers and nonsmokers. These data suggest that marijuana use does not increase the burden of cervical HPV infection or SIL.

Route(s)Inhalation
Dose(s)
Duration (days)
Participants2,584 HIV-seropositive and 915 HIV-seronegative women
DesignOpen study
Type of publicationMedical journal
Address of author(s)Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. gdsouza@jhsph.edu
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