Clinical Studies and Case Reports

On this site you will find clinical studies with cannabis or single cannabinoids in different diseases and case reports on the use of cannabis by patients.
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TitleA pilot clinical study of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.
Author(s)Guzman M, Duarte MJ, Blazquez C, Ravina J, Rosa MC, Galve-Roperh I, Sanchez C, Velasco G, Gonzalez-Feria L.
Journal, Volume, IssueBr J Cancer 2006;95(2):197-203.
Major outcome(s)THC was well tolerated in this pilot study of intrakranial cannabinoid administration
IndicationCancerAbstract
MedicationDelta-9-THC

Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids inhibit tumour growth and angiogenesis in animal models, so their potential application as antitumoral drugs has been suggested. However, the antitumoral effect of cannabinoids has never been tested in humans. Here we report the first clinical study aimed at assessing cannabinoid antitumoral action, specifically a pilot phase I trial in which nine patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme were administered THC intratumoraly. The patients had previously failed standard therapy (surgery and radiotherapy) and had clear evidence of tumour progression. The primary end point of the study was to determine the safety of intracranial THC administration. We also evaluated THC action on the length of survival and various tumour-cell parameters. A dose escalation regimen for THC administration was assessed. Cannabinoid delivery was safe and could be achieved without overt psychoactive effects. Median survival of the cohort from the beginning of cannabinoid administration was 24 weeks (95% confidence interval: 15-33). Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol inhibited tumour-cell proliferation in vitro and decreased tumour-cell Ki67 immunostaining when administered to two patients. The fair safety profile of THC, together with its possible antiproliferative action on tumour cells reported here and in other studies, may set the basis for future trials aimed at evaluating the potential antitumoral activity of cannabinoids.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 27 June 2006; doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6603236 www.bjcancer.com.

Route(s)
Dose(s)20-180 microgram daily
Duration (days)11-64
Participants9 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (brain tumour)
DesignOpen study
Type of publicationMedical journal
Address of author(s)Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, School of Biology, Complutense University, Madrid 28040, Spain.
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