Clinical Studies and Case Reports

On this site you will find clinical studies with cannabis or single cannabinoids in different diseases and case reports on the use of cannabis by patients.
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TitleRandomized, controlled trial of cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis.
Author(s)Rog DJ, Nurmikko TJ, Friede T, Young CA.
Journal, Volume, IssueNeurology 2005;65(6):812-9.
Major outcome(s)Cannabis is effective in reducing pain and sleep disturbance in patients with multiple sclerosis related central neuropathic pain
IndicationMultiple sclerosis;PainAbstract
MedicationCannabis

BACKGROUND: Central pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) is common and often refractory to treatment.
METHODS: We conducted a single-center, 5-week (1-week run-in, 4-week treatment), randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial in 66 patients with MS and central pain states (59 dysesthetic, seven painful spasms) of a whole-plant cannabis-based medicine (CBM), containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol:cannabidiol (THC:CBD) delivered via an oromucosal spray, as adjunctive analgesic treatment. Each spray delivered 2.7 mg of THC and 2.5 of CBD, and patients could gradually self-titrate to a maximum of 48 sprays in 24 hours.
RESULTS: Sixty-four patients (97%) completed the trial, 34 received CBM. In week 4, the mean number of daily sprays taken of CBM (n = 32) was 9.6 (range 2 to 25, SD = 6.0) and of placebo (n = 31) was 19.1 (range 1 to 47, SD = 12.9). Pain and sleep disturbance were recorded daily on an 11-point numerical rating scale. CBM was superior to placebo in reducing the mean intensity of pain (CBM mean change -2.7, 95% CI: -3.4 to -2.0, placebo -1.4 95% CI: -2.0 to -0.8, comparison between groups, p = 0.005) and sleep disturbance (CBM mean change -2.5, 95% CI: -3.4 to -1.7, placebo -0.8, 95% CI: -1.5 to -0.1, comparison between groups, p = 0.003). CBM was generally well tolerated, although more patients on CBM than placebo reported dizziness, dry mouth, and somnolence. Cognitive side effects were limited to long-term memory storage.
CONCLUSIONS: Cannabis-based medicine is effective in reducing pain and sleep disturbance in patients with multiple sclerosis related central neuropathic pain and is mostly well tolerated.

Route(s)Sublingual
Dose(s)5-62.5 mg
Duration (days)35
Participants64
DesignControlled study
Type of publicationMedical journal
Address of author(s)Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. djrdjr@doctors.org.uk
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