Clinical Studies and Case Reports

On this site you will find clinical studies with cannabis or single cannabinoids in different diseases and case reports on the use of cannabis by patients.
You may search for diseases (indications), authors, medication, study design (controlled study, open trial, case report etc.) and other criteria.

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TitleCannabinoids in multiple sclerosis (CAMS) study: safety and efficacy data for 12 months follow up.
Author(s)Zajicek JP, Sanders HP, Wright DE, Vickery PJ, Ingram WM, Reilly SM, Nunn AJ, Teare LJ, Fox PJ, Thompson AJ.
Journal, Volume, IssueJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 2005;76(12):1664-9.
Major outcome(s)Spasticity in the Ashworth scale was significantly reduced by an average of 1.82 in the THC group; no significant reduction in the cannabis group
IndicationSpasticity;Multiple sclerosisAbstract

OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness and long term safety of cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis (MS), in a follow up to the main Cannabinoids in Multiple Sclerosis (CAMS) study. METHODS: In total, 630 patients with stable MS with muscle spasticity from 33 UK centres were randomised to receive oral Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), cannabis extract, or placebo in the main 15 week CAMS study. The primary outcome was change in the Ashworth spasticity scale. Secondary outcomes were the Rivermead Mobility Index, timed 10 metre walk, UK Neurological Disability Score, postal Barthel Index, General Health Questionnaire-30, and a series of nine category rating scales. Following the main study, patients were invited to continue medication, double blinded, for up to 12 months in the follow up study reported here. RESULTS: Intention to treat analysis of data from the 80% of patients followed up for 12 months showed evidence of a small treatment effect on muscle spasticity as measured by change in Ashworth score from baseline to 12 months (Delta(9)-THC mean reduction 1.82 (n = 154, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53 to 3.12), cannabis extract 0.10 (n = 172, 95% CI -0.99 to 1.19), placebo -0.23 (n = 176, 95% CI -1.41 to 0.94); p = 0.04 unadjusted for ambulatory status and centre, p = 0.01 adjusted). There was suggestive evidence for treatment effects of Delta(9)-THC on some aspects of disability. There were no major safety concerns. Overall, patients felt that these drugs were helpful in treating their disease. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide limited evidence for a longer term treatment effect of cannabinoids. A long term placebo controlled study is now needed to establish whether cannabinoids may have a role beyond symptom amelioration in MS.

Duration (days)350
DesignControlled study
Type of publicationMedical journal
Address of author(s)Peninsula Medical School, Plymouth, PL6 8BX, UK,
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