Clinical Studies and Case Reports

On this site you will find clinical studies with cannabis or single cannabinoids in different diseases and case reports on the use of cannabis by patients.
You may search for diseases (indications), authors, medication, study design (controlled study, open trial, case report etc.) and other criteria.




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TitleMarijuana to prevent nausea and vomiting in cancer patients: a survey of clinical oncologists.
Author(s)Schwartz RH, Voth EA, Sheridan MJ.
Journal, Volume, IssueSouth Medical Journal 1997 Feb;90(2):167-72.
Major outcome(s)Only a small percentage of oncologists prescribed marijuana
IndicationNausea/vomiting;Cancer chemotherapyAbstract
MedicationCannabis

Marijuana, if rescheduled by the Drug Enforcement Agency, would be the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug to be administered by smoking. American physicians need timely, factual information about probable usage patterns and potential adverse effects of medical marijuana, and a factual complete review of the literature on the subject. We mailed a survey to 1,500 American clinical oncologists. Of particular interest was whether and how often in the past 24 months these physicians recommended smoked marijuana, synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol, or 5-HT3 (serotonin) antagonists (ondansetron [Zofran], granisetron [Kytril]) for their patients. We also inquired whether and how often the oncologists would prescribe marijuana in the form of cigarettes, were it to be FDA-approved. Completed surveys were received from 1,122 (75%) of the oncologists. The percentages of oncologists who prescribed or recommended selected antiemetics more than five times between 1992 and 1994 were 98% for 5-HT, antagonists, 6% for dronabinol (Marinol), and 1% for smoked marijuana. We also found that 332 (30%) of the oncologist-respondents to this nationwide survey supported rescheduling of marijuana for medical purposes; however, two thirds (67%) of the 332 respondents who were in favor of rescheduling estimated that they would write less than one prescription per month for marijuana cigarettes. A comprehensive literature review failed to provide persuasive evidence to recommend marijuana as a needed antiemetic medicine.


Route(s)
Dose(s)
Duration (days)
Participants
DesignSurvey
Type of publicationMedical journal
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